Easter Art, Craft and Science Ideas

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Visit our Pinterest board for Easter and spring-inspired recipes, games, crafts, art and more.

Happy Easter, everybody!

Have you decorated you eggs yet or are you, like our family, suddenly realizing your weekend is going to be busier than you thought?! In case you are still looking for some quick and fun ideas to spice up your holidays, you’ve come to the right place. These are some of our favorite Easter ideas from the previous years that we are planning to bring back to life on Saturday! Hope you can join us.

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These easy salt-and-watercolors eggs make a great Easter garland or wreath. You can also make flowers or butterflies like this. Easy, fun and kids love it. Here’s how to do it.

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See how you do this. You can either use a crayon to draw on a hot hard-boiled egg and watch it melt. Or you can shred the crayon, color your egg and roll it in the shredded wax before the egg cools down too much.

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I love Pisanky! And this melted-crayon above the muffin tin is as close as you can get with small kids. You still needs to be careful but it is not that difficult technique to masker. Here’s how to do it – and remember, you can always color the egg before or after you are done.

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And one more idea: the ultimate Easter science project: the naked egg! See how you can make it in just a couple of days. Just make sure you make more than one because the kids will love it and will be devastated it is breaks… (at least mine were).

Antarctica in art

The Art around the world course is slowly finishing up. This week we have visited the land of ice and snow: Antarctica.

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It was a pretty ambitions project that I am very proud to say: we were able to finish in 50 minutes! Kids were playing around with watercolors. They used light and dark blue, lemon juice, salt, sponges, tissues, water and foil to create an interesting snowy effect for the background of their painting. Then we talked about the way to create a penguin, sketched it on a piece of watercolor paper, cut it out and decorated it with tempera paint. Kids loved adding sweater, mittens, hats and more fun stuff to keep their penguins warm and cozy.

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Then we glued the penguins onto the watercolor paper and added some snow. Done. Hectic but totally worth it!

Pissarro and Harvest

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arTree magazine is celebrating the fall with you! In the November issue you can learn about Camille Pissarro and one-point perspective. We’ll show you some easy tricks to make your paintings stand out! You will discover the secrets of the corn mazes and create your own! You will paint on leaves and test your creativity. You’ll dry apples to make fall decorations and create fall art in your backyard!

Subscribe to the digital art magazine today for $9.99 for the whole year and discover the art for yourself!And if you, you will have a chance to win an art prize for the creations that you share with us! And they are definitely worth more than $10! Have a question? Ask us at info@arTreeKids.com

Little O’Keeffe

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This week my Little Artists (3-5 years old) learned about Georgia O’Keeffe and colors in nature.

I brought some flowers for them to explore with magnifying glasses. We talked about details and close-ups and looked at many different paintings. It was fun. Kids touched, smelled and really looked at all the different kinds of flowers. Then they selected the one flower they wanted to paint.

They worked on canvas with sharpies and liquid watercolors and really enjoyed the process (it was much less messy than I thought it would be). They painted with brushes and then – with the flowers and we talked about the differences. I love how they turned out – all different.

Black flowers are in

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The Sun has come to Seattle and with that, it is much easier to feel the spring fever. Everything is starting to bloom and find ourselves wanting to draw all of that.

This weekend we decided to paint a colorful garden – and were looking for an idea that would be fun for 5 year-olds and easy enough a 2 year olds could do it… and this worked great. First, the kids used liquid watercolors and sea sponges to mix beautiful and cheerful backgrounds. Then, we let it dry and used sharpies to draw a garden over it. Simple.

You can see more of our recent projects on our Instagram page.

Easter Eggs-travaganza, day 4: Bubble-wrap

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This has been our favorite technique as well. Use watercolors to paint on a bubble wrap instead of on the paper. Kids think it is really fun and they love stamping with it. I’d recommend to cut the wrap into small pieces, the bigger ones can get very difficult to handle… and if your kids decide (like mine) to stamp their face, it will cover only a small part.

Easter Eggs-travaganza, day 3: Salt & Watercolors

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One of my favorite watercolor technique is using salt. It is very simple, the results are beautiful and it beautifully combines science and art.

Let the kids use watercolors – any way they want to and when they are done (and the painting is not dry yet), sprinkle some salt on it (we used just regular salt but the rock/ice-cream salt is great too). Then let it dry, get the salt off and you are done… almost.

We decided to cut out Easter eggs out of the paper and they played with different ways we could use them. We made a paper-plate nest for them, we cut it in half and made a chicken that was just about to hatch from one, we used glitter glue to make it even fancier, made a 3D egg to stick in out flowers, used sharpies to draw simple lines and patterns… and stuck some on black paper (and wow, did they stood out!). I am sure you can come up with even more ideas… unfortunately, we ran out of the eggs at this point 🙂

Btw, if you want to explain your kids how the salt affects the paint… here is an idea I read somewhere. You may want to emphasize the idea that salt absorbs water by asking them how they feel after eating very salty chips. They get thirsty because the salt absorbs the water in their bodies just like it absorbs the water in their paintings. Simple for even a 3-year-old to understand.

Monet for little ones

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So, this is my favorite watercolor idea combination: wax resist and Claude Monet. It makes sense to me. Everybody had crayons at home, wax resist a very simple technique that even the smallest kids can master very well, and Claude Monet… well, what can I say? I love Impressionists and the “not finished” or “almost abstract” feel to their paintings is easy for kids to master.

So, what can you do?

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I also included a .pdf document that has all the instructions (including the home-made watercolors) and you can print it out, share it… whatever you want. It is but a small preview from the magazine-in-making. If you like it, check out the Kickstarter campaign an spread the word. Thank you guys and enjoy the colorful project with your little ones.

As always, there are more ideas at our Pinterest and Facebook pages.

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Make your own watercolors

Making your own watercolors is much easier than you may think. I know I was surprised. This is how to do it:

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Part of the fun is trying to come up with a list of things you need to chop, cook and strain to get the colors you want… but if you want to start with some foundation (instead of running all over the kitchen and your garden), here is a good starting point:

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Next time, I’ll show you what you can do with these beautiful colors, introduce Claude Monet and Impressionism and show you a fun and engaging technique with cool results that your kids are sure to like. Stay tuned.

This project is part of the arTree magazine. If you want to learn more about it, follow us on Facebook and check out the Kickstarter campaign – there ares till two more weeks to become one of the first subscribers to a brand new ad-free magazine filled with art.