Picasso’s Head

Ever since I heard about the wire + stocking sculpture, I wanted to try it – what what better way to introduce this unique medium than combining it with self-portrait lesson dedicated to Pablo Picasso. These statues are pretty simple to make (especially for grades 2 and up) but they take a long time to dry. I used acrylic paint and still needed several coats. I’d recommend doing this if you have enough time to let it dry for couple of days before decorating it. Other than that – super fun way to introduce form, discussion about face, proportions and Cubism!

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If you want to see more ideas about Cubism, Pablo Picasso and self-portraits, click here.

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Paper Birds of Diana

February issue of arTree magazine is out! Do you want to learn all there is to learn about birds, including Diana’s amazing paper sculptures?

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Why birds?

One day Diana was walking on the beach and for the first time in her life she saw a swan. It was fighting with a couple of ducks and its flight and expression was amazing. She was fascinated. As soon as she came home she picked up some paper and tried to capture it while it was fresh I her head. After that she just couldn’t stop.

Learn more about her amazing work and the inspiration behind it! Subscribe today: http://artreekids.com/

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See more of Diana’s work at her website!

Calder and mobiles

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Today my Little Artists and I talked about colors in motion. We talked about the mobiles they had above their cribs… and that Alexander Calder was the first person who made them, almost a hundred years ago. Why? He loved sculpture but thought that it missed something–movement. So, he tried to find a way to make his sculptures move.

Then we discussed the most important thing when making a mobile: balance.

What is a balance? It’s the way of spreading your weight equally so that you do not fall.

Why is important? If the sculpture was not balanced right, it would drop to one side and would not move much. It needs to be just right so that it moved in the air.

We also balanced ourselves – on our feet, on masking tape on the floor and on bumpy dots.

After that it was time to make a balancing sculpture. We drew pictures on our colorful circles and then folded them in in half. I helped them attach the pipe cleaners inside, made a hole on the top and attached a string. The kids tried to balance it on their finger and then went on to add the fun part: play dough.  They worked hard to balance their sculptures so that they did not lean too much to one side. Surprisingly easy for everybody (even the 3-year-olds). It was wonderful!

Food, food and food!

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October issue of arTree magazine is here! And it will make you really hungry!

We will explore food and sculpture with Claes Oldenburg. There will be huge donuts and tiny clay fish, paper hamburgers and clay ones. We will conduct science experiments and play with our food. There is something for everybody, and then some. Plus, this issue has 20% more pages and art projects!

Want to start?

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You can buy just this one issue and give it a try. If you enjoy it and want to subscribe, let us know and we will offer a discounted rate $8 instead of $9.99).