Little O’Keeffe

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This week my Little Artists (3-5 years old) learned about Georgia O’Keeffe and colors in nature.

I brought some flowers for them to explore with magnifying glasses. We talked about details and close-ups and looked at many different paintings. It was fun. Kids touched, smelled and really looked at all the different kinds of flowers. Then they selected the one flower they wanted to paint.

They worked on canvas with sharpies and liquid watercolors and really enjoyed the process (it was much less messy than I thought it would be). They painted with brushes and then – with the flowers and we talked about the differences. I love how they turned out – all different.

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Blooming CDs

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Do you have a pile of used CDs that are completely useless? Great!

Take them aside and paint over the shiny part of the CDs with black paint. Once it is dry (allow a couple of hours so that it is completely dry otherwise it will not work well), use sticks to scratch out beautiful flowers. The great thing is, the colors will look wonderful in the sun and it is SO easy even a 2-year-old will love to do this.

Then cut out several circles out of construction paper. Cut holes in the middle and attach them with a split pin. If you make more flowers, you can use the split pin to attach them all to a big piece of paper along with other flowers… maybe onto different colored construction paper – Kandinsky-circle style.

This is a fun rainy-afternoon project as well as a fun O’Keefe activity for preschoolers. It teaches about recycling, positive and negative space… and if you work as a group, it teaches about collaboration.

Black flowers are in

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The Sun has come to Seattle and with that, it is much easier to feel the spring fever. Everything is starting to bloom and find ourselves wanting to draw all of that.

This weekend we decided to paint a colorful garden – and were looking for an idea that would be fun for 5 year-olds and easy enough a 2 year olds could do it… and this worked great. First, the kids used liquid watercolors and sea sponges to mix beautiful and cheerful backgrounds. Then, we let it dry and used sharpies to draw a garden over it. Simple.

You can see more of our recent projects on our Instagram page.