Alcohol Inks with Preschoolers

photo 2

 

Have you ever tried using alcohol inks before? I love it, especially in the holiday time. It is so easy that it is an awesome project even for toddlers (if you are ok with their hands being colorful for a couple of days).

You just need some alcohol inks and a blending solution.

Then you just put a little blending solution onto the ornament (or a tile, like we did later) and start dropping the inks onto the ornament. The more blending solution you use, the more the inks will blend into each other (and the more space they will cover).

It truly is that simple!

Once it dries, it can be washed and it stays on. Just do not put anything edible on it.

We even made some coasters out of 16-cent tiles. We just glued some felt underneath and made a fun holiday-gift for kids’ teachers and parents in under 5 minutes and $1.

photo 5 photo 4 photo 3

Try Cézanne art lessons, videos and presentations

YAY! Our new website has launched! We have worked on it for a while now and I cannot even tell you how excited I am that it is launched and done!

Anyway, I’d love to show you how it looks! And what better way to look at our magazine, video trainings and presentations than to give you free access to at least one issue.  Here it is.

It is filled with pages of art projects for kids 5-10 years old.

I chose one of my favorite issues of the magazine. I just love Paul Cézanne. Check it out, maybe you will fall for his apple paintings as well. For me, it is always about the back story…  did you know, why he painted over 200 paintings of the apples for 30 years? You will know it in a minute…

free cezanne art lessons for kids

Just click this link and let me know what you think: https://artreekids.com/magazine/issues/2014/11/

Do not forget to check out the ‘see training materials’ to access videos, presentations and more.

Astonish Paris with an Apple!

apple2

Paul Cézanne said, he wants to astonish Paris with an apple – and after 30 years of hard work and dedication, he did.

Show the kids how they can do the same. Give them an apple, piece of paper, oil pastels and little bit of oil in a cup. First, the kids sketch the basic shape of the apple and then color it in with the oil pasels. It does not have to be perfect but it is nice if they can press down hard (to get nice, bold colors) and hold their pastels down low (so that they do not break).

apple

When they are done, ask them to dip a q-tip in the oil and use it to blend the oil pastels together. They will be amazed how smoothly iy works and how much fun it is. Just make sure, they do not spill the oil. I put a paper plate underneath and keep a lot of paper towels handy, just in case.

If you want to achieve the same effect we did – use watercolors in the end to paint over the background. The good thing is, if you do paint over the apple, it doesn’t really matter since the paint does not stick to the oil at all. Just wipe it off with a paper towel and you are done.

I am doing this project in a couple of days with first-graders – but we will do more than apples. We’ll talk about composition and add pumpkins and squashes to the mix. Stay tuned for the pictures!

Cézanne, the fall is here

cezanne_facebook

Enjoy the season with Paul Cézanne and his still life paintings. Learn why he painted apples for over 30 years and why it took so long for art critics to appreciate them. Create your own still life with apples, pumpkin and squashes.

Discover how oil blends oil pastels and hairspray makes chalk pastels stick to the paper. Play around with composition and use a flashlight to shine some light on your art while you learn about highlights and shadows. Transfer your art using wet media film and test how observant you are.

Conduct a taste test, pay homage to famous artists with John Nolan and, most of all, enjoy the fall!

Click here to get started (if you subscribe now, you will get additional 12 issues of arTree at no charge).

Picasso Monsters

Happy Halloween!

We have decided to try the Picasso-inspired monsters project this year. I saw the idea flying around Pinterest a long time ago and waited for the right moment – now it’s here!

picasso_witches

These amazing monsters, ghouls and witches were created by first graders (with no help at all).

I put together a short presentation, if anybody wants to use it. It is one spooky lesson about Pablo Picasso, organic and geometric shapes and faces. Here is the link:

http://1drv.ms/1x9Dmny

It was really a fun lesson and kids were so proud of their creations. They loved seeing what others came up with… from witches, cyclops and scary pirates and zombies to Egyptians, from teeth with cavities to eye patches and curly tongues… and from short hair to horns and loooong and pointy witches hats.

And impressionism was born!

monet2

I just came across an interesting article for kids. Do you know when an Impressionist movement started?  Now, you can find out precisely when: a Texas physicist has figured out down to the the exact minute when the Impressionism art movement was born. By his calculations, it began Nov. 13, 1872, right around 7:35 a.m. local time!

Read the article here and share it with the kids. It’s a fun way to connect the common core and art once again!

Fore more art projects about Impressionists and Claude Monet, look up the May issue of arTree (5/2014).

Torn magazines to Win magaiznes

These paintings are reproductions of famous masterpieces, recreated in torn magazine pages. I love the details, colors and shapes that they used, don’t you?

Do you recognize some of them? Post a comment with a name of one of the artists (or the paintings) and I will choose one person to get arTree magazine subscription for the whole year for free!

magazine04

magazine03

magazine02

magazine01

Thank you, Art People Gallery, for finding these.

Dream with Marc Chagall

facebook_chagall

 

September issue fo arTree magazine is dedicated to one of my favorite artists: Marc Chagall. I loved his dreamy images ever since I was little and fell for his art once more when I saw his original paintings in NYC. The soft colors, wild perspective and surrealist scenes have always fascinated me… and now, I’d like to share it with you, your kids, students and friends.

In the latest arTree issue you can discover Expressionism, monochromatic colors and the art of Marc Chagall. You get to fly over your city, play violin with goats and ride on a rooster! You can decorate your windows with stained glass just like Daniel Maher and catch your bad dreams! Bake stained-glass cookies and draw a window to your imagination.
If you want to join the adventure, click here to subscribe. If you subscribe by the end of September, you receive 12 issues of arTree for no additional cost.

Learn more about Marc

book
Click here to listen to a book ‘Dreamer in a Village.’

chagall_pin
Looking for more art ideas? Click here to get started!

Daniel Maher’s Recycled Windows

maher

Did you know you can take old glasses and turn them into these stunning windows?

We were very excited when we found Daniel. He is the perfect match for our September issue of the magazine, dedicated to Marc Chagall and Dreams.

So who is he? Daniel is a unique stained-glass artist. He restores old windows and creates new ones. He also recycles old glass plates, bottles and bowls into amazing windows. He puts together everything he finds: pictures of grapes from serving plates and a glass from Mr. Peanut jars or ‘little pig went to a market’ plaque, corn serving plates and a corn mash. He uses objects with history to tell stories with his art. Some are more abstract (capturing emotions) and some more narrative (telling real stories) but all of them are quite fascinating.

And how does he do it? Here’s a little preview:

maher2

Picasso’s Head

Ever since I heard about the wire + stocking sculpture, I wanted to try it – what what better way to introduce this unique medium than combining it with self-portrait lesson dedicated to Pablo Picasso. These statues are pretty simple to make (especially for grades 2 and up) but they take a long time to dry. I used acrylic paint and still needed several coats. I’d recommend doing this if you have enough time to let it dry for couple of days before decorating it. Other than that – super fun way to introduce form, discussion about face, proportions and Cubism!

pablo

If you want to see more ideas about Cubism, Pablo Picasso and self-portraits, click here.